Hiking Club Ventures To World Wonder

By Brianna Metzler

On Saturday, March 17, Pueblo’s Hiking Club, consisting of 13 students, five chaperones and advisor Mr. Ernesto Somoza met at Pueblo at 3:30 a.m. in order to get on the road at 4:30 a.m.—sharp—in order to make it to the Grand Canyon. Along the way, they stopped at Sunset Point for breakfast and to readjust to the drastic weather change, putting on additional clothing, jackets, beanies and gloves.

There was nearly a 40-degree difference from Tucson weather to Northern Arizona temperatures.

The Hiking Club spent four days touring the South Rim of the Grand Canyon. The weather continued to get colder—from approximately 40 degrees down to 27 degrees, for a high. The trip quickly turned from a normal camping trip to a “snow” camping trip.

During the club’s first night, around 2 a.m., snow began falling—and students awoke to four inches in the morning. The club was prepared for this event, and camping resumed with some adjustment to the weather.

The overnight lows dipped to 11 degrees, which students prepared for—using multiple sleeping bags, cold-weather grade blankets, snow gloves and beanies.

Senior Thai Kromrei said that this was the first time in his life that he actually saw snow falling.

“I’ve seen snow before—but it was always after I woke up in the morning,” Kromrei said. “This experience was as awesome as the hike itself. I am glad that I brought a thick Mexican blanket to keep warm.”

Sponsor Somoza said, “The students were amazing on this trip! They adjusted to the weather without any complaints. I did give students an opportunity to vote if they wanted to stay or return to Tucson, and all students wanted to stay in order to hike into the Grand Canyon on Monday, March 19.”

Students, chaperones and Somoza completed the hike to Indian Garden (South Rim)—specifically on the Bright Angel Trail. This 13-mile round trip hike took 10 hours—and the group endured an elevation change of 3,500 feet.

“I want to congratulate all of the students who completed this hike. Not only did they complete the hike as individuals, they helped each other throughout the entire hike,” Somoza said. “Some students were struggling towards the end, but as a team, they encouraged and helped each other make it up.”

Senior Iram Arce, a “guest” on this trip due to a Hiking Club member not being able to go at the last minute, said, “After spending weeks in Alaska a few years back, I suppose that 11 degrees didn’t bother me too much. I was grateful for the experience of seeing Northern Arizona and experiencing a part of Arizona that I don’t get to very often. Thanks, Mr. Somoza, for this opportunity!”

The Hiking Club members were welcomed to Tucson and 80-degree temperatures on Tuesday, March 20.

President senior Annette Durazo said, “I loved this trip—it was truly an out of this world experience—but it was also nice to return to sunshine and warm temperatures in Tucson. This was my first time to the Grand Canyon, and I’m certainly planning to return some day. I’m proud of my hiking team peers that they united during this trip—truly, we seemed like one family looking out for one another.”

The Hiking Club is planning one last outing this school year—to Sedona, Ariz., on May 12.

‘WOW’: Skaters Search For Space

by Celestina Marinez

There is a history to Pueblo’s “WOW” (“Warriors on Wheels”) Club, which has transitioned to “Smokeout Skateboards”, an organization that currently has a Facebook page. They even promote their club on their own t-shirts.

Unfortunately, not many people have seen these t-shirts because of the printed illegal paraphernalia: cigars in the shape of skateboards as well as “a lot of smoke” on the front of these shirts, which might be construed by some as “a disruption of the educational process”—as they are banned from Pueblo’s campus.

Daniel Coronado Solis, a senior, made the initiative to turn a small group of skateboarders into an official club, thanks to their sponsor Mr. Gene Balsz.

For one year, WOW was very visible on Pueblo’s campus, doing their tricks and spinning their wheels. However, the club was dissolved when administrative support for the skateboarders waned.

Solis said, “At first Mr. R. [Rosthenhausler] seemed supportive. However, after a year or so of promising us a spot on campus to skate, eventually we were told by administration that we could no longer skate because of possible injuries.”

“It was kind of depressing to all of the skaters because we couldn’t do what we loved most,” Solis said. “Our lunch time became very sad.”

Armando Alcoverde, another senior who was been with the club for about a year, said that he, too, was devastated when the skateboarders were told not to skate anymore.

“I’ve always used skateboarding as a great way to relieve stress and anxiety,” Alcoverde said. “One day, when I was practicing new tricks on campus before classes started, I landed on the skateboard wrong, and as a result, my board went flying and my head hit the cement—enough to give me a Level One concussion.”

Alcoverde said that he was sent home after his injury, which he describes as “the lowest form of concussion”.

Soon after this incident, Rosthenhausler put a red light to the club, citing that they were insurance liability to the school.

Freshman Santiago Estrella is new to the club this year, even though officially the club doesn’t exist at Pueblo. However, Solis insists that his Smokeout Skateboard is the new “WOW”.

“I would like to bring back WOW to Pueblo, officially, next year as sophomore,” Estrella said. “We are going to have to be persuasive with Pueblo’s administrators—and somehow convince them that we are worthy of having our own club again. Maybe if we promised to wear protective gear, they might listen to us.”

“If a student gets hurt in football or another core sport, administrators don’t cancel these clubs,” Estrella said. “Many students have had concussions from other sporting events, and yet they continue at Pueblo?”

Our skateboarders are still trying to persuade Rosthenhausler for a permanent location for them to practice their trade. There is no word yet if students will be allowed to spin their skateboard wheels on campus next year.

“Even though I’m graduating in May,” Alcoverde said, “I would love to leave a legacy—and that is to see a skateboard club reinstated here at Pueblo.”

Hiking Club: Mount Everest Is The Limit!

  

By Ashley Cordova & Elizabeth Noriega

Pueblo Hiking Club at Organ Pipe National Monument

Pueblo’s Hiking Club, sponsored by Mr. Ernesto Somoza, is off and running to new heights this year, as a record number of Warriors have joined—a total of approximately 50!—including about 10 adults, which include several teachers.

Last school year, 13 Hiking Club students participated in a Grand Canyon experience during spring break, which may have contributed to the high number of students joining this year, Somoza said. The trip was “very successful” and seemed to be an impetus for students wanting to join this school year.

Somoza plans to repeat this trip during spring break this March—due in part to the success of the club’s tax credit drive which raised more than $1,250. He added that he would love to take students to out-of-state hikes, including Yosemite in Central California and Arches National Park in Southern Utah—among other places. The more tax credit donations that the club receives, the more trips the club can partake in during the school year.

He added that only 10 students are able to participate in the Grand Canyon trip, and this participation is based on students’ generous tax dollars they donate to the club as well as their activeness in the club throughout the school year.

Mr. Ernesto Somoza (Left) with his sister Melissa Somoza at Humphrey’s Peak, the highest natural point in Arizona at 12,633 feet!

“The club has an excellent variety of students this year,” Somoza said. “They come with a variety of skill levels and with an enthusiasm to spend time in the outdoors.”Meetings take place in Mr. Somoza’s classroom (T-12) after school on the first Tuesday of each month. Club President Anette Durazo ensures that the club stay organized and helps approve hiking trips.

Durazo said, “Being in the Hiking Club has truly helped me become more outgoing. I love Arizona more than I did being. Going to Sedona last April really opened my eyes about seeing this great state. I love being outdoors a lot more now and appreciating nature.”

She added that the club’s next trip is scheduled for Feb. 10 to Colossal Caves, just east of Tucson.

“Even though I’m a native Tucsonan, I’ve never been to Colossal Caves,” Durazo said. “In fact, I’ve never been inside a real cave and looking forward to it.”

Senior Thai Kromrei, who has been a member of the Hiking Club for two years, said, “I’ve gotten to experience seeing Arizona. It’s such a beautiful and geographically diverse state. I want to see it all now, and thanks to Mr. Somoza, we are seeing a great chunk of it.”

The club was founded in ­­­­the fall of 2015, Somoza’s first full school year.

The inception of the Hiking Club was the result of a conversation that Somoza had with (then) Assistant Principal Alma Carmona while attending a conference in Colorado. Somoza was talking to her about how he wanted to become more involved outside of the classroom. As a result of his over-zealous spirit, Carmona encouraged Somoza to become a Class of 2019 sponsor as well as the advisor of the newly-found Hiking Club.

“I hiked a lot during my college years, and I wanted students to experience what I enjoyed so much,” Somoza said.

He added that besides the Grand Canyon trip, Hiking Club members can expect other adventurous moments this semester—including the trip to Sedona and other small trips around the Tucson area.

“After I graduate, I plan to stay involved with the Hiking Club,” Durazo said. “Perhaps I could be a chaperone for high school students’ trips—to give me a chance to see more of Arizona and help promote a very worthy club.”

Let’s Go Hikin’

By Alex Pesqueira

It seems that almost every teenager today in the 21st century is on his or her phone for hours each day—playing video games or exploring social media. However, communications media technology teacher Mr. Ernesto Somoza is changing pastimes for many of our Pueblo Warriors. He is the sponsor/adviser of the schools hiking club.

When Somoza initiated this club two years ago, only a handful of students committed to being in the hiking club. But, through the word of mouth and some promotion, the hiking club has more than 30 Pueblo students.

This school year, Somoza is planning to take the club to new levels—including a trip to the Grand Canyon in the spring.

During this past summer, Somoza was already researching trips to Tumamoc Hill, Sabino Canyon, the Tucson Mountains—among other locations in Southern Arizona.

“Arizona is a hiker’s paradise,” Somoza said. “Even around Tucson, there are wonders to be explored for the average hiker. I look forward to experiencing these local treasures sometime this school year.”

The Hiking Club meets every first Tuesday of the month, and they hike once a month.

“Right now we’re planning a trip to the Grand Canyon which will be for about 10 students,” Somoza said. “We’ll be spending a couple days there! This will be happening sometime in the spring, although I haven’t set a definite date yet.”

He added that there is still room in the club for any students still interested in joining the Hiking Club. Somoza said that students do not need any experience hiking because there are several levels of hikers in the club.

“I will make accommodations for all levels of hikers,” Somoza said.

Please see Mr. Ernesto Somoza in Room T-12 after school every first Tuesday of the month if you are interested or curious about the club.

Pueblo Hiking Club

Lauren Ahern El Guerrero Pueblo 2015  Nayeli Sanchez El Guerrero Pueblo 2015

 

 

By Lauren Ahern and Nayeli Sanchez

Pueblo Hiking Club Victor Garcia Ernesto Samoza Jawney Rios
From Left to Right: Victor Garcia, Sponsor Ernesto Samozo & Jawney Rios on Tumamoc Hill

From the beginning of the year, Mr. Ernesto Somoza, who is a CTE teacher, has started a new hiking club that meets monthly for Pueblo students who want to explore the Arizona mountain ranges.

This club consists of 15 Pueblo students, Somoza said. Their first meeting was on Sept. 2, when they discussed their first hike to Tumomac Hill. The club meets on the first Thursday of each month to discuss their next hike, and on the third Saturday of each month, the actual hike takes place, normally at 8 a.m. Transportation is provided, and each hike takes about 1-2 hours.

Pueblo Hiking Club Flier 2015
Join the Hiking Club

President Luis Molina, a senior, encourages students to join because “it’s a lot of fun, and the more the merrier.”

“The purpose of this club is to gain appreciation for nature and to interact with one another,” said Somoza.

As the year goes on, Somoza explained that the hikes will eventually become more complex. Some of the hikes include Sabino Canyon and Picacho Peak.

Everyone is encouraged to join this club, and if you want monthly reminders, text: @hikepueblo to 81010; also listen for reminders on Warrior Radio.

Annual Fiesta De Los Guerreros Set For April 17, 2015

By Felicity Aguilar and America Cardenas

Fiesta Warriors Club 2015

Standing: Sponsor Adalberto Rodriguez, Carlos Jaimez & Enrique Rebolledo
Sitting: Diana Rodriguez, Angel Morales & Andrea Morales

Our Fiesta De Los Guerreros will be held on Friday, April 17, 2015; this annual event has been a tradition at Pueblo since 1957.

This is a free community event that will be held from 4:30-11:00 in the school patio and will feature bands such as Monarkas Del Norte and Los Aucentes De Sínaloa this year. These bands play mexican cumbías & most of our favorite norteño songs. A DJ will play hip hop music to satisfy everybody’s musical tastes. There will also be special performances by our feeder school’s folkloricos and mariachis. Check out the full entertainment schedule online.

“Planning for Fiesta de los Guerreros is year round,” said sponsor Adalberto Rodriguez, Pueblo’s Media Specialist. “It’s such a big event, that the day after Fiesta, we start planning for the next year’s.”

President of the Fiesta Warriors Club, junior Diana Rodriguez, said, “I really hope that more people attend this year’s Fiesta because it helps a lot of our clubs. Also, because of City of Tucson budget cuts, this year we’re going to have tables and not just booths for clubs to raise money.”

Vice president of the Fiesta Club, junior Carlos Jaimez, said, “Fiesta is one of the best events we have here at Pueblo. Clubs can fundraise and make a lot of money. Guests can buy food, play games, dance and have fun. It’s just an all around blast!”

Fiesta charges clubs a fee of ten percent of their night’s profits, and there is an annual competition for the best decorated booth & table. If the club wins first or second place, they do not have to pay the ten percent fee.

“The Science club has been the winner of the best decorated booths for the past four years.” said Rodriguez, “I cannot wait to see what clubs have in store for us this year.”

Fiesta welcomes over 1,000 people each year including, students, faculty, alumni and community members.

Visit www.fiestadelosguerreros.com for more details & follow them on Facebook.