Warriors Bleed To Make A Difference

By Alina Cuen

“I’m glad that I could make a difference”, said Damian Garcia.

On Wednesday, Oct. 2, the Red Cross hosted another blood drive, the first of this school year. As usual, our Warriors gladly participated—not just students but also six teachers.

A total of 31 pints of blood were donated, including one “power red” (the giving of red blood cells).

“Overall, the Red Cross was impressed with the turnout,” said Student Council advisor and teacher Ms. Sarah Sutton. “They thought Pueblo was very nice and respectful and were very generous.”

One student who gave blood, junior Damian Garcia, was one of the 25 students who donated.

“I’m glad that I could make a difference,” Garcia said, “and I loved how helpful and friendly the Red Cross was.”

According to Sutton, the next scheduled blood drive will be later this semester, although a date has not yet been determined.

Homecoming 2018

Tailgate Party at Homecoming 2018

Tailgate
By Getsemani Cazares and Sophia Shivers

On Friday, Sept .28, Pueblo’s homecoming was punctuated by a tailgate party, organized by our own student council members.

Ms. Sarah Sutton, who is beginning her first year as student council teacher/advisor, started the year off to organizing this huge event.

Sutton said, “Everything at Homecoming went well for being my first year of being a part of student council.” She added that she was very impressed by the huge numbers of alumni who showed up for this event.

Many clubs participated in the tailgating event, which is a grand opportunity for clubs to raise money for their clubs.

Sutton said, “There were about 20 clubs selling, and student government gets five percent of what the clubs earn because of the effort and costs of putting up posters and preparing for events like this.”

Despite a very successful tailgating night, student council admitted that they faced some difficulties in preparing for this event.

Vice President Class of 2022 Angelina Cecil said, “There was miscommunication, and clubs were not setting-up in their correct location. But in the end, everything worked out.”

Angella Armenta, secretary for the Class of 2022, has a few suggestions that can help improve Pueblo’s next events.

Armenta said, “Clubs can definitely learn how to be more organized. Better communication is needed and a better way to handle the tickets needs to be discussed for next year.”

Still, Sutton feels that Tailgating 2018 was a very successful event. “We’ll all be better off next year.”

Warriors Defeat ‘The Undefeated’
By Adamaris Castillo and Jessica Prado-Rascon

What better way to kick off the fall weather for the Warriors then to blowout the Douglas Bulldogs, after a very disappointing 1-4 losing streak! The 2018 Homecoming game was a perfect day for the Warriors to show the world what they’re actually made of.

After losing a few consecutive games, the Warriors practiced diligently to ensure that they had a dramatic and triumphant comeback on the field at this year’s homecoming game.

…With a win of 47-0, our Warriors made this homecoming one for the books!

Running back and linebacker Omar Ibanez (#34) said, “I felt like I stepped up. In fact, we all stepped up as a team to play for each other rather than playing for ourselves. I also felt that everybody on the team brought all of our strengths together to complete the goal we had set for this game.”

Senior Flavio Gonzalez (#77), defensive end, said, “The game against Douglas really united the team and got the stamina rolling for us. I think that this game actually helped us build the chemistry that we needed to sustain us through the rest of the season.”

Robert (“Bobby”) Jackson (#1), a senior and a wide receiver, said, “I felt like this game really brought the team closer to being a real team—a whole team. During the homecoming game, we truly showed our true colors—and they were some bright ones!”

According to Head Coach Brandon Sanders, “Defeating an undefeated team was a definite wake-up call for the players. Their ‘inner Warrior’ awakened!”

He added, “The homecoming game was a solid win for us—definitely winning at the right time. The team truly showed the world what we Warriors can do.”

Sam Lopez & Arlie Kontic crowned King & Queen

Royalty: Some Traditions Never Die
By Candy Rodriguez and Alyssa Soza

The traditional crowning of royalty during homecoming’s halftime definitely brought great anticipation and excitement to the Pueblo community. At last, our Warriors finally got to see who they chose for king and queen; this year, seniors King Sam Lopez and Queen Arlie Kontic were named Pueblo’s royalty.

“I was a little surprised that my peers voted for me,” Queen Arlie Kontic said. “All week long, I was a little nervous. I wondered how I would act if I won, and when I did, I actually didn’t make a fool of myself.” She paused and added, “Being homecoming queen was the cherry on top of a really great day. The next day was my birthday.”

King Sam Lopez said, “I was genuinely surprised that I was voted king, and I was even rooting for the other nominees [Chuck and Lulu],” Lopez said. “I felt that my peers really respect me and appreciate me. I am very humbled to accept my peers’ votes to be their homecoming king.”

Seniors Chuck Hindley and Lulu Pereira were honored to have been nominees, as were Alex Cocio and Renee Olvera.

“I was honored to have been nominated for queen,” Pereira said. “Two ‘L’s make a ‘dove’.” She explained that she and Chuck Hindley were prom prince and princess nominees, and we were nominated—but lost—this year.

“I still feel lucky to have been nominated,” Pereira said. “What a great honor, and I couldn’t be happier for Sam and Arlie for being our king and queen this year.”

Dance On Saturday?
by Jacquelyn Gutierrez

For the first time in recent memory, Pueblo High School held their homecoming dance the day after the actual football game, on Saturday, Sept. 29 inside the South Gym. Actually, this dance almost didn’t happen, but members in the Student Council take the initiative to proceed with homecoming dance plans.

For the 2018-19 school year, Pueblo High School’s student government decided to host prom a day after the football game because many wanted a more formal look to the homecoming dance. In past years, students attended homecoming dance directly after the game—usually in jeans and sweatshirts.

Ms. Sarah Sutton, the new student government sponsor, said, “I am extremely proud of how the junior class held this whole thing [homecoming dance] together. Overall, it seemed like everyone had their fun [at the dance], which is the whole point.”
Junior class treasurer, Damon Carrasco said, “Homecoming dance gave students a lot more time to prepare, compared to past years when the dance was immediately after the game.” She paused and added, “I really believe that Saturday worked out great, and I hope that we continue to hosting the homecoming dance the day after the football game.”

Although, the dance was not on a traditional Friday, there was a large turnout of over 100 students with an unexpected appearance of a live band, PELT, kicking off the night.

Senior Marina Rivera said, “I loved the band at the beginning. The music was great and gave a great feel to just kick back for a bit,” Rivera said, “I just thought the DJ should have played more of a variety of music, that’s the only thing I didn’t like.”

Along with the crowd, there was a German presence at his very first homecoming dance.

“I loved it. In Germany we don’t have events like this, so it was so nice to have been able to experience something like this,” Said Sophomore foreign exchange student Johannes Grundler

Overall, the crowd was pleased with the great job that the junior class did in hosting the Homecoming dance this year.

Class Of 2022 Freshmen Endure First Quarter

By Getsemani Cazares & Sophia Shivers

Class of 2022 Warriors: William Santos, Tanya Rivera & Daidryan Mendivil (L to R)

Thursday, Aug. 2, 2018, wasn’t just the first day for nearly 1,850 students but the first day for incoming freshmen (the Class of 2022), ready to experience their first year of high school at Pueblo.

This year, Pueblo can boast 444 freshmen; that number is up from last year, when we had 410 freshmen, according to Ms. Rachel Apalategui, Pueblo’s registrar.

One new Pueblo freshman, Marie Romero, attended Hollinger K-8 during her middle school years and admitted that she is prepared for her high school experience.

Romero said, “I’m looking forward to passing and surviving my freshman year without any distractions.”

Another Warrior freshman, William Santos, who attended Roberts Naylor K-8 school, said that he had no fear when it came to attending Pueblo.

Santos said, “I’m focusing on getting good grades and making the boys’ varsity basketball team.”

Tanya Rivera, also from the Class of 2022, also attended Hollinger K-8, said that she is currently getting the high school vibe.

“I look forward to learning how to play the flute and making new friends,” Rivera said.

Freshman Jesus Romero attended Pistor Middle School prior to officially becoming a Warrior, and he said that he had a very exciting first day as a high school student.

“My plan is to earn good grades the entire year and be a part of the Pueblo High School wrestling team,” he said.

Daidryan Mendivil, who graduated from South Gate Middle School last spring, said the he had an easy transition from middle school to high school. Mendivil said that he plans to stay committed to a few sports and clubs. In fact, he already joined TRIO, a club that focuses on students’ collegiate futures.

Mendivil said, “I’ll admit that I’m a little nervous, but I’m going to continue to focus on earning good grades and football and basketball.”

Freshman (and sophomore) counselor Ms. Marian Finely has some great advice for our freshmen to be successful this year and for the remainder of the school year.

“Don’t flunk any of your classes,” she said. “Also, get involved in clubs, and don’t get involved with the wrong group. Stay true to yourself.”

Hiking Club Ventures To World Wonder

By Brianna Metzler

On Saturday, March 17, Pueblo’s Hiking Club, consisting of 13 students, five chaperones and advisor Mr. Ernesto Somoza met at Pueblo at 3:30 a.m. in order to get on the road at 4:30 a.m.—sharp—in order to make it to the Grand Canyon. Along the way, they stopped at Sunset Point for breakfast and to readjust to the drastic weather change, putting on additional clothing, jackets, beanies and gloves.

There was nearly a 40-degree difference from Tucson weather to Northern Arizona temperatures.

The Hiking Club spent four days touring the South Rim of the Grand Canyon. The weather continued to get colder—from approximately 40 degrees down to 27 degrees, for a high. The trip quickly turned from a normal camping trip to a “snow” camping trip.

During the club’s first night, around 2 a.m., snow began falling—and students awoke to four inches in the morning. The club was prepared for this event, and camping resumed with some adjustment to the weather.

The overnight lows dipped to 11 degrees, which students prepared for—using multiple sleeping bags, cold-weather grade blankets, snow gloves and beanies.

Senior Thai Kromrei said that this was the first time in his life that he actually saw snow falling.

“I’ve seen snow before—but it was always after I woke up in the morning,” Kromrei said. “This experience was as awesome as the hike itself. I am glad that I brought a thick Mexican blanket to keep warm.”

Sponsor Somoza said, “The students were amazing on this trip! They adjusted to the weather without any complaints. I did give students an opportunity to vote if they wanted to stay or return to Tucson, and all students wanted to stay in order to hike into the Grand Canyon on Monday, March 19.”

Students, chaperones and Somoza completed the hike to Indian Garden (South Rim)—specifically on the Bright Angel Trail. This 13-mile round trip hike took 10 hours—and the group endured an elevation change of 3,500 feet.

“I want to congratulate all of the students who completed this hike. Not only did they complete the hike as individuals, they helped each other throughout the entire hike,” Somoza said. “Some students were struggling towards the end, but as a team, they encouraged and helped each other make it up.”

Senior Iram Arce, a “guest” on this trip due to a Hiking Club member not being able to go at the last minute, said, “After spending weeks in Alaska a few years back, I suppose that 11 degrees didn’t bother me too much. I was grateful for the experience of seeing Northern Arizona and experiencing a part of Arizona that I don’t get to very often. Thanks, Mr. Somoza, for this opportunity!”

The Hiking Club members were welcomed to Tucson and 80-degree temperatures on Tuesday, March 20.

President senior Annette Durazo said, “I loved this trip—it was truly an out of this world experience—but it was also nice to return to sunshine and warm temperatures in Tucson. This was my first time to the Grand Canyon, and I’m certainly planning to return some day. I’m proud of my hiking team peers that they united during this trip—truly, we seemed like one family looking out for one another.”

The Hiking Club is planning one last outing this school year—to Sedona, Ariz., on May 12.

Pueblo Community Invited To Attend ‘Borderlands’

  

by Paula Fierros & Daniela Moreno

On Saturday, Feb. 3, in Room T-12, graphic design teacher Mr. Ernesto Somoza held a meeting promote a project called “Borderlands”. Since then, he has organized and orchestrated other meetings—all leading up to an April 21 trip to the U.S.-Mexico border.

In February, six local artists attended the meeting and shared the same enthusiasm as Somoza, as well as their experiences in the field of art, specifically on and about the border.

“Our mission for this project is to help the students interact with the community and focus on the seriousness of the border,” Somoza said. “Beautiful art work is needed to change the ugliness of the border.”

The first artist to speak was Pueblo alumni Ruben Romero, from the Class of 1994; he donated pieces of his artwork, which contain a lot of political and cultural symbolism.

Romero said, “It is important to fuel the fire for the next generation of activists and to shine the light on human cruelty.”

A group of activists known as Derechos Humanos (Human Rights) with three representatives spoke about the way they have dealt with controlling of immigration and the border.

“What our group does is represent the rights every immigrant that crosses the border has,” said spokesperson Rachel Garcia. “Our group has a tradition where we have a pilgrimage to San Xavier carrying crosses that we made with the names of dead people found in the Arizona desert border towns—which is known as The Disappeared Art Project, and we lay the crosses down in front of San Xavier.”

Mr. Alfred Quiroz, an art professor at the University of Arizona, recalls several experiences with artists to create a more “aesthetically pleasing” border. However, in 2010, he was forced to remove the pieces due to the reconstruction of the border.

“A funny story is that I went to Nogales, and I saw my art,” Quiroz said. “I noticed it was little crooked, so I went to fix it, and an older man across the street yelled at me not touch the art. I explained to him that I was one of the artists who created that piece, and I asked him why he yelled at me. He responded that everyone from around there loved the art. It built the community’s unity.”

The last speaker was a former Pueblo student/artist, Hecho Diaz.

He said, “I came to this school [Pueblo] but was kicked out.”

Diaz said that he later became a graffiti “writer”, and he is also a graphic designer who has worked with big companies, creating graphics for them. He remains fervid about his community using his social media platform.

“I have seen and experienced things but the border is ridiculous, this country was built by immigrants,” Diaz said. “The border is a representation of how America feels about the Mexicans.”

Somoza said that the theme of the competition will be butterflies, and anyone who chooses to attend the event will be able to put these magnetic butterflies on the border wall—as well as project their artwork on the border wall.

He added that the butterflies are a metaphor—as they are creatures who migrate from the South to the North for better weather, “Immigrants migrate for a better life, too,” Somoza said.

The art competition ended on March 24. The first place winner received $300, and his/her art will be projected onto the border April 21 in Nogales, Ariz., with the following longitude N. 31 and latitude 19.998 W 110 54 651, along with all submissions near the Hudgen’s abandoned courthouse.

Somoza suggested that those wanting to attend this event should leave Tucson at 5:30 p.m. in order to arrive in Nogales at approximately 6:30 p.m. He added that if people have questions about this event, they should contact him ASAP in Room T-12. Somoza said that he is also providing transportation to the border wall for students with permission slips and approval—pending district approval.

If anyone is interested in submitting art, please email it to: submitborderlandsart@gmail.com.

Representative Raúl Grijalva (D) has publicly acknowledged his approval of this project and may attend the event on April 21.

Science Class Visits Park, Studies Saguaros

By Getsemani Cazares

On Monday, Feb. 19, Pueblo teacher Ms. Elizabeth Raizk escorted her juniors and seniors in her advanced placement environment science class on a field trip to nearby Saguaro National Park (West) to study our desert’s indigenous cacti.

On this trip, approximately 15 miles west of Pueblo High School, students studied different sizes of saguaros—as well as to measure their heights and temperatures. Students even studied bird holes in these saguaros.

Raizk said, “There were four groups of six students, and each group’s job was to study a different plot, each with five saguaros.”

Students were required to hike to find their “assigned” saguaros, so they used a GPS and a photo log, which were helpful resources to these students.

Raizk said, “My students and I were outside for two hours, so after all of the hiking, we spent some time at the Visitors Center to eat lunch.”

Senior Maria Servellon attended the field trip, and she expressed that this event ended up being a “blessing”.

“[Before the trip] I was totally stressed—about grades, tests and deadlines,” Servellon said, “so this field trip was definitely an outlet for me.”

She added, “At first, however, I thought this would be just an average hiking trip through a land of cactus. However, my peers and I had an opportunity to conduct annual saguaro surveys and observed how certain cacti grow over time and how they measure environmental impacts. I learned that saguaros are great indicators of weather patterns and water patterns.”

Senior Marco Madrigal also attended the field trip.

“I very much enjoyed the experiences about this field trip—especially how to measure saguaros and learn that the desert is an integral part of where we live,” Madrigal said. “We definitely learn a lot more when we actually get to experience learning instead of reading about saguaros out of textbooks. I’ll never forget everything I learned on this field trip.”

Saguaro National Park (West) boasts many visitors, Raizk said, but not many native students, which Raizk think is “a shame” because the Park is the “grand symbol” of the Sonoran Desert.

Saguaros should be respected by all, Raizk said, and they are especially culturally important to the Tohono O’odham Nation. These Native Americans harvest ripe saguaro fruit in the spring to make wines, jams, and jellies. Saguaro wine is ritually consumed during Nawait I’i, a Tohono O’odham rain ceremony.

Few people know that saguaros are the largest of all cactus species in the United States and can grow to more than 40 feet tall and can weigh more than a ton! Saguaros can also live to be between 100 and 200 years old. Some saguaros can grow as many as 25 “arms”; some grow none.

On March 1, 1933, in the last days of his presidency, Herbert Hoover signed a proclamation that established the Saguaro National Monument, which was considered a victory for both botanists and boosters in Arizona who had worked for years to protect this species. Most importantly, in 1961, at the urging of the people of Tucson and Secretary of Interior Stewart Udall, President John F. Kennedy added 25 square miles of splendid cactus lands in the Tucson Mountains to the Monument.

Finally, after setting aside vast areas as wilderness, Congress elevated Saguaro to “National Park” status in 1994.

Raizk said, “The desert is a piece of all of us.”