Warriors Express Gratitude

Candy Rodriguez

Compiled by Candy Rodriguez

So Very Thankful

The 2,000 or so students, faculty, staff and administrators in the Pueblo High School community have historically been very expressive regarding their gratitude in light of Thanksgiving. Here are just a few of those voices:

Andrew Romero, senior: “I am thankful for my family,and worldly possessions. However, more than anything I am grateful to be living…and for my girlfriend.”

Austin Davis, sophomore: “I am thankful for my Subway sandwiches and my friend, Sabino.”

Brian Alegria, sophomore: “I am really thankful for thrash metal music and my mother.”

Anahiz Lopez, sophomore: “I love my older twin sister, Analia. She defends me, and although she can sometimes be a little mean, I still love her.”

Eduwiges (Vicky) Cordova, senior: “I am thankful for my education, family, and friends also the roof over my head.”

Mariel Ponce, sophomore: “Everything that’s been given my way.”

Genesis Alba, junior:“I’m grateful for that God blessed me with privileges like my education, my family, and the love they shower me in—and being able to eat.”

Mr. Frank Rosthenhausler, Principal: “I’m thankful for the opportunity to lead this great school.”

Jesus Soto, junior: “I’m thankful for all the strength and blessings God has given me.”

Ruben Rivera IV, senior: “I’m thankful for Coach Sanders for teaching everything I’ve learned these past four years. I’m thankful for my team for being some real dawgs and never backing down.”

Andres Jorge Lujan, senior: “I’m thankful to have both of my parents living under the same roof.”

Ms. Katherine Gunnels, Assistant Principal: “I am thankful that I have a lot of good cooks in my family,and that my husband is the most amazing man ever.”

Sabino Raygoza: “I am thankful for my friends and family and my red Air Max’s.”

Nicole Del Toro, junior: “I am thankful for my parents and the people that genuinely care about me.”

Isaac Guerrero, junior: “I am thankful for my family,for my earphones, and ice cream, too.”

Darian Aldaco, sophomore: “I am thankful for having a roof over my head and a place to sleep.”

Mr. Steve Lopez, assistant principal: “I am thankful to be back home, Pueblo is home to me.”

Antonio Rodriguez, senior: “I am thankful for friends and family.”

Ms. Amaro, chemistry teacher: “Thankful for wonderful students at Pueblo and in the Chemistry Club.”

Andres Apodaca, senior: “I am thankful for my mom because that’s why I’m here today.”

Ryana Talavera, senior: “I’m very thankful for my two friends, Candy and Michael, because they have helped me through a lot and have always been there for me.”

Ms. Elizabeth Raizk, science teacher: “I’m most thankful for the students here at Pueblo. They’re kind, perspective, and they keep me going.”

Zahira Barcelo, sophomore: “I’m just thankful for what I have.”

Angelica Aros, attendance secretary: “I am thankful for my family because I love them; they are my everything.”

Ms. Teresa Toro, counselor: “Very thankful for my health, family, and my extended family at Pueblo.”

Susie Esquivel, senior: “I am thankful for my brother because if it weren’t for him, I wouldn’t have pursued my interest as a musician. He’s inspired me for everything I do in my life, and he’s my best friend.”

Aaron Cano, junior: “I am thankful for everything my parents have done for me and everything that my girlfriend does for me.”

Carlos Molina, junior: “I’m thankful for my family and friends and how supportive they have been for me in baseball and life.”

Mia Carpenter, junior: “I’m thankful for my eyelashes because they don’t need mascara.”

Mark Anthony, junior: “I’m very thankful for all the opportunities I’ve been given.”

Ms. Kate Straub, nurse: “I am thankful for my health, my job here at Pueblo and also my family…I feel like I pretty much have everything I need in this world.”

Bryan Ramierz, junior: “I’m thankful for my mother because she cares for me, and she motivates me to always work hard.”

Jose Montoya, sophomore: “First of all, I’m thankful for my family because they love me, and they’re always there for me.”

Adam Pelayo, junior: “I’m thankful for the great life that I have and I’m also thankful for my parents because they work so hard.”

Ms. Goya Ruiz, campus monitor: “I’m thankful for my kids, my family, and good health.”

Adrian Cervantes, junior: “I’m thankful for everything—but specially my mom, my clothes, the rest of my immediate family, and of course my grandma.”

Paula Fierros, senior: “I’m thankful for everyone who has made my senior year pleasant and memorable so far, especially Mr. Medhi who elected me editor-in-chief this year. He’s the best.”

Ms. Marie Little, yearbook/exceptional ed teacher: “I am thankful for my health, my son[s] and my family.”

Martin Martinez, senior: “I’m thankful that my baseball career has become as success. I’ve been offered several baseball scholarships, including one from Minnesota.”

Mr. Ernesto Somoza, graphic design teacher: “I am strongly thankful for my five four-legged, furry friends as well as my friends and family-and, at last, for my ever-growing friends and family at Pueblo.”

Solar Panels Project Shines At Pueblo

by Paula Fierros & Celestina Marinez

Pueblo Solar Panel Project 2018 by Leo Parra

Even though the solar panels project in the parking lot was supposed to be completed before the beginning of this school year, this construction project did not begin until July 16, making the beginning of the school year a bit chaotic for many employees and students looking for parking spaces.

More than three months later, the project is nearing completion. Final work continues,and an expected date of completion is estimated to be near the end of the semester.

Mr. Mark Farcis, a foreman for the Future Vervan Energy corporation, said, “We are nearing the end of our stay here,” he said. “All that is left is to connect all of the panels to one power source.”

Completion of this project will ease parking nightmares for faculty, staff and students.

“Traffic in and out of Pueblo has been horrid,” said Assistant Principal Mr. David Montaño, “but we’ve done the best we could do under these circumstances. We hope that everybody can be a little patient because in the end, we’re going to have a beautiful new parking lot that will be environmentally impactful.”

Due to a reduced number of spaces in our usual parking lot due to the installation of the panels, many teachers have had to park in the several new areas that have been designated temporary parking locations.

In the end, the solar panels will be improving the environment as well as reducing the district’s electricity bill.

“Cutting the energy bill in half is always a good thing,” said Ms. Kathryn Gunnels, assistant principal.

The big plan is to go green will take over the district. Many schools in T.U.S.D. have already completed their own solar panels projects in those schools’ parking lots.

Gunnels said, “We live in a world with limited resources, and it makes perfect sense to use our unlimited resource in Arizona—the sun.”

Hiking Club: Only Going Up

by Paula Fierros

Hiking Club poses at the Desert View Watchtower during their trip to the Grand Canyon.

During fall break, the Outdoor Adventures’ Club (aka, Pueblo’s Hiking Club) traveled to the Grand Canyon for four days, beginning on Oct. 13, with sponsors Mr. Ernesto Somoza and language arts teacher Ms. Angela Gonzalez.

Somoza said that trip was a“triumph”, although club members faced minor challenges. For example, thetemperature plunged to 20 degrees, and yearbook/exceptional education teacher Ms.Marie Little, a chaperone, injured her knee.

“Anything can happen on a trip like this,” Somoza said. “The trails are rigorous.”

Senior Andrew Romero, who describes himself as a “fervid member” of the Hiking Club, said, “I love this club because it gives me a chance to be active, and I love traveling. I love the outdoors. I’m not stuck to my phone.”

Leo Parra, a junior and member of the Hiking Club, said, “The sights [this school year] have been beautiful, and I’ve made a lot of crazy new friends while making a lot of new experiences.”

Not all of the trips will be as extensive as the Grand Canyon, Somoza added. The club plans on small trips to Tumamoc Hill and Madera Canyon—about a three-mile hike for each.

In November, new students will have an opportunity to join the Hiking Club with the restart of the “point system”—that is, collecting points from attending meetings, participating in the hiking trips and providing supplies for these trips. 

Starting all over will allow students to join the club and build their points up to be able to participate in the trips.

“I expect students to participate in all our monthly meetings and join us on the majority of our camping/hiking trips,” said Somoza. “I have high expectations for our members and expect a certain amount of loyalty.”

There are at least two significant hiking and two camping trips left this school year. In December, the club will be venturing to Phoenix and hiking the trails of Camelback Mountain. In March, during spring break, the club will be going to White Sands National Monument in Southern New Mexico.

Club president Kevin Lopez, a senior, said his experiences during the trips so far this school have been “therapeutic” and were positive bonding experiences. He also said that being outdoors is always a humbling and refreshing feeling.  

Somoza, who has been the sponsor of this club for the past four years, said that the Hiking Club is a long overdue organization.

“I was incredibly involved in both high school and college,” he said. “Now, as a teacher, I want students to go outdoors and enjoy the outdoors.”

The Outdoors Adventure Club has already collaborated with Pueblo’s television class (taught by Mr. Michael Gunnels) to produce a promotion to attract future club members.

Somoza said, “With this promotion, students will be able to tell their friends and family this year and get even more members involved.” He paused and added, “We also extended out to Tucson High to collaborate with them on trips. Our hope is to extend to other schools throughout Tucson, including University High School next year—to produce an inner-city Hiking Club.”

Somoza wants his students to “unplug” and appreciate their surroundings.

“I want students to see and hear their memories,” said Somoza, “and to spark their interest for the outdoors. That’s all I want.”

Warriors Bleed To Make A Difference

By Alina Cuen

“I’m glad that I could make a difference”, said Damian Garcia.

On Wednesday, Oct. 2, the Red Cross hosted another blood drive, the first of this school year. As usual, our Warriors gladly participated—not just students but also six teachers.

A total of 31 pints of blood were donated, including one “power red” (the giving of red blood cells).

“Overall, the Red Cross was impressed with the turnout,” said Student Council advisor and teacher Ms. Sarah Sutton. “They thought Pueblo was very nice and respectful and were very generous.”

One student who gave blood, junior Damian Garcia, was one of the 25 students who donated.

“I’m glad that I could make a difference,” Garcia said, “and I loved how helpful and friendly the Red Cross was.”

According to Sutton, the next scheduled blood drive will be later this semester, although a date has not yet been determined.

Homecoming 2018

Tailgate Party at Homecoming 2018

Tailgate
By Getsemani Cazares and Sophia Shivers

On Friday, Sept .28, Pueblo’s homecoming was punctuated by a tailgate party, organized by our own student council members.

Ms. Sarah Sutton, who is beginning her first year as student council teacher/advisor, started the year off to organizing this huge event.

Sutton said, “Everything at Homecoming went well for being my first year of being a part of student council.” She added that she was very impressed by the huge numbers of alumni who showed up for this event.

Many clubs participated in the tailgating event, which is a grand opportunity for clubs to raise money for their clubs.

Sutton said, “There were about 20 clubs selling, and student government gets five percent of what the clubs earn because of the effort and costs of putting up posters and preparing for events like this.”

Despite a very successful tailgating night, student council admitted that they faced some difficulties in preparing for this event.

Vice President Class of 2022 Angelina Cecil said, “There was miscommunication, and clubs were not setting-up in their correct location. But in the end, everything worked out.”

Angella Armenta, secretary for the Class of 2022, has a few suggestions that can help improve Pueblo’s next events.

Armenta said, “Clubs can definitely learn how to be more organized. Better communication is needed and a better way to handle the tickets needs to be discussed for next year.”

Still, Sutton feels that Tailgating 2018 was a very successful event. “We’ll all be better off next year.”

Warriors Defeat ‘The Undefeated’
By Adamaris Castillo and Jessica Prado-Rascon

What better way to kick off the fall weather for the Warriors then to blowout the Douglas Bulldogs, after a very disappointing 1-4 losing streak! The 2018 Homecoming game was a perfect day for the Warriors to show the world what they’re actually made of.

After losing a few consecutive games, the Warriors practiced diligently to ensure that they had a dramatic and triumphant comeback on the field at this year’s homecoming game.

…With a win of 47-0, our Warriors made this homecoming one for the books!

Running back and linebacker Omar Ibanez (#34) said, “I felt like I stepped up. In fact, we all stepped up as a team to play for each other rather than playing for ourselves. I also felt that everybody on the team brought all of our strengths together to complete the goal we had set for this game.”

Senior Flavio Gonzalez (#77), defensive end, said, “The game against Douglas really united the team and got the stamina rolling for us. I think that this game actually helped us build the chemistry that we needed to sustain us through the rest of the season.”

Robert (“Bobby”) Jackson (#1), a senior and a wide receiver, said, “I felt like this game really brought the team closer to being a real team—a whole team. During the homecoming game, we truly showed our true colors—and they were some bright ones!”

According to Head Coach Brandon Sanders, “Defeating an undefeated team was a definite wake-up call for the players. Their ‘inner Warrior’ awakened!”

He added, “The homecoming game was a solid win for us—definitely winning at the right time. The team truly showed the world what we Warriors can do.”

Sam Lopez & Arlie Kontic crowned King & Queen

Royalty: Some Traditions Never Die
By Candy Rodriguez and Alyssa Soza

The traditional crowning of royalty during homecoming’s halftime definitely brought great anticipation and excitement to the Pueblo community. At last, our Warriors finally got to see who they chose for king and queen; this year, seniors King Sam Lopez and Queen Arlie Kontic were named Pueblo’s royalty.

“I was a little surprised that my peers voted for me,” Queen Arlie Kontic said. “All week long, I was a little nervous. I wondered how I would act if I won, and when I did, I actually didn’t make a fool of myself.” She paused and added, “Being homecoming queen was the cherry on top of a really great day. The next day was my birthday.”

King Sam Lopez said, “I was genuinely surprised that I was voted king, and I was even rooting for the other nominees [Chuck and Lulu],” Lopez said. “I felt that my peers really respect me and appreciate me. I am very humbled to accept my peers’ votes to be their homecoming king.”

Seniors Chuck Hindley and Lulu Pereira were honored to have been nominees, as were Alex Cocio and Renee Olvera.

“I was honored to have been nominated for queen,” Pereira said. “Two ‘L’s make a ‘dove’.” She explained that she and Chuck Hindley were prom prince and princess nominees, and we were nominated—but lost—this year.

“I still feel lucky to have been nominated,” Pereira said. “What a great honor, and I couldn’t be happier for Sam and Arlie for being our king and queen this year.”

Dance On Saturday?
by Jacquelyn Gutierrez

For the first time in recent memory, Pueblo High School held their homecoming dance the day after the actual football game, on Saturday, Sept. 29 inside the South Gym. Actually, this dance almost didn’t happen, but members in the Student Council take the initiative to proceed with homecoming dance plans.

For the 2018-19 school year, Pueblo High School’s student government decided to host prom a day after the football game because many wanted a more formal look to the homecoming dance. In past years, students attended homecoming dance directly after the game—usually in jeans and sweatshirts.

Ms. Sarah Sutton, the new student government sponsor, said, “I am extremely proud of how the junior class held this whole thing [homecoming dance] together. Overall, it seemed like everyone had their fun [at the dance], which is the whole point.”
Junior class treasurer, Damon Carrasco said, “Homecoming dance gave students a lot more time to prepare, compared to past years when the dance was immediately after the game.” She paused and added, “I really believe that Saturday worked out great, and I hope that we continue to hosting the homecoming dance the day after the football game.”

Although, the dance was not on a traditional Friday, there was a large turnout of over 100 students with an unexpected appearance of a live band, PELT, kicking off the night.

Senior Marina Rivera said, “I loved the band at the beginning. The music was great and gave a great feel to just kick back for a bit,” Rivera said, “I just thought the DJ should have played more of a variety of music, that’s the only thing I didn’t like.”

Along with the crowd, there was a German presence at his very first homecoming dance.

“I loved it. In Germany we don’t have events like this, so it was so nice to have been able to experience something like this,” Said Sophomore foreign exchange student Johannes Grundler

Overall, the crowd was pleased with the great job that the junior class did in hosting the Homecoming dance this year.

Class Of 2022 Freshmen Endure First Quarter

By Getsemani Cazares & Sophia Shivers

Class of 2022 Warriors: William Santos, Tanya Rivera & Daidryan Mendivil (L to R)

Thursday, Aug. 2, 2018, wasn’t just the first day for nearly 1,850 students but the first day for incoming freshmen (the Class of 2022), ready to experience their first year of high school at Pueblo.

This year, Pueblo can boast 444 freshmen; that number is up from last year, when we had 410 freshmen, according to Ms. Rachel Apalategui, Pueblo’s registrar.

One new Pueblo freshman, Marie Romero, attended Hollinger K-8 during her middle school years and admitted that she is prepared for her high school experience.

Romero said, “I’m looking forward to passing and surviving my freshman year without any distractions.”

Another Warrior freshman, William Santos, who attended Roberts Naylor K-8 school, said that he had no fear when it came to attending Pueblo.

Santos said, “I’m focusing on getting good grades and making the boys’ varsity basketball team.”

Tanya Rivera, also from the Class of 2022, also attended Hollinger K-8, said that she is currently getting the high school vibe.

“I look forward to learning how to play the flute and making new friends,” Rivera said.

Freshman Jesus Romero attended Pistor Middle School prior to officially becoming a Warrior, and he said that he had a very exciting first day as a high school student.

“My plan is to earn good grades the entire year and be a part of the Pueblo High School wrestling team,” he said.

Daidryan Mendivil, who graduated from South Gate Middle School last spring, said the he had an easy transition from middle school to high school. Mendivil said that he plans to stay committed to a few sports and clubs. In fact, he already joined TRIO, a club that focuses on students’ collegiate futures.

Mendivil said, “I’ll admit that I’m a little nervous, but I’m going to continue to focus on earning good grades and football and basketball.”

Freshman (and sophomore) counselor Ms. Marian Finely has some great advice for our freshmen to be successful this year and for the remainder of the school year.

“Don’t flunk any of your classes,” she said. “Also, get involved in clubs, and don’t get involved with the wrong group. Stay true to yourself.”